Knowles takes over from brother to lead Brown Hill

HOLDING the senior captaincy role has been an exciting and challenging experience for Brown Hill’s Jason Knowles.

Knowles, who began his career as a junior at the club, has this season taken over the first eleven skipper’s role from brother Ryan.

The all-rounder said it was a responsibility he was relishing.

“The club gave me the captaincy because Ryan didn’t have the time and commitment as usual.

“They thought they’d try me and see how I went,” said Knowles, who served as interim captain while Ryan was injured late last season.

“Everyone wants to be a leader at some point. It’s a big thing to be given it by your club.

“I’m still trying to learn a few things, but it’s good to have senior blokes like Ryan and Matt McMahon around me that can help out with it as well.”

Knowles’ start to the 2012-13 Ballarat Cricket Association season has been hampered by a freak injury, sustained when celebrating a wicket during the Bulls’ round two clash with Mt Clear.

The accident occurred when opening bowler McMahon, who had dived to take a catch, threw the ball, while still on his back, straight into the mouth of Knowles.

The result was two broken front teeth.

“I’ve had a couple of setbacks with my teeth and I haven’t been bowling much, but I think my performances are okay at this stage,” Knowles said.

“The captaincy probably takes away from training a little bit because I’m organising training drills and trying to get players to training. A lot of it is the organisation behind the scenes.”

Leading the club for years to come is a goal for Knowles, who, at just 24, has amassed a rather impressive cricketing

CV.

Some of his highlights include captaining junior Brown Hill teams, as well as a Ballarat under-14 representative side, being part of six senior Melbourne Country Week carnivals and earning selection in the Victoria Country under-21 line-up.

A season of cricket in England, as the winner of the annual Cricket Willow scholarship in 2009, also features on the highlight reel.

“It brought my batting technique along a fair bit because you have got to be more patient over there.

“They have slower, lower wickets and you have to play yourself in. Here, you can sort of play your shots a bit quicker,” Knowles said.

“You get a fair bit of a different outlook on cricket and it changes you as a person a bit, which I think is going to help with my captaincy because I’ve seen cricket over there.

“I have played under five different captains.”

tim.oconnor@thecourier.com.au

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