The day when AC/DC came to Ballarat

AC/DC's Malcolm Young (left) with Brian Johnson, Angus Young, Phil Rudd and Cliff Williams pose for photographers at the Apollo Hammersmith in London in 2003.  Photo: Yui Mok/AP
AC/DC's Malcolm Young (left) with Brian Johnson, Angus Young, Phil Rudd and Cliff Williams pose for photographers at the Apollo Hammersmith in London in 2003. Photo: Yui Mok/AP

I was saddened to learn of the passing of ACDC's co-founder and guitarist Malcolm Young at the age of 64.

No doubt his passing will be recognised worldwide by fans and associates and his family. ACDC is a remarkable story of post war migration.

Members were made up of migrant children whose parents took a leap of faith, venturing into the unknown to provide a better life for their families.

They came from Scotland, England and the Netherlands as 10 pound tourists in that wave of migration of the 1950's and 60's, as did many other European families at that time.

Formed in 1973, ACDC was produced and managed by older brother George and his associate Harry Vanda who were both members of the Easybeats,

Australia's first successful international band who had the audacity to successfully rival the Beatles in the previous decade.

Like or hate ACDC's hard rocking music with Malcolm's recognisable guitar riffs, they will go down in history as Australia's most successful and enduring band.

Even more remarkable is that ACDC is firmly entrenched into the social history of Ballarat as they performed at the Civic Hall on January 14, 1977 in their Giant Dose of Rock and Roll Tour.

The Easybeats also performed at the Civic Hall in the 1960's.

Many of Civic Hall's performers were indeed children of migrants who became successful nationally and internationally and their stories are woven in the social fabric of this dramatic and unique building.

It was the first dedicated performing arts venue in Victoria.

As time passes and a generation has been disconnected with the Civic Hall, it is time for Ballarat to embrace the building's incredible social history and look forward to the re-birth and reopening of the Civic Hall so the community can once again enjoy the benefits and opportunities that this amazing community space will bring if it is left intact and tastefully restored.

R.I.P. Malcolm Young.

Judith Buchanan, Sebastopol