Canadian Lead Primary pupils will use their STEM skills to innovate their way toward a better future

CARROT TECH: Canadian Lead grade five student Aurora works on her science, technology, engineering and maths skills with a low-tech carrot. Picture: Lachlan Bence
CARROT TECH: Canadian Lead grade five student Aurora works on her science, technology, engineering and maths skills with a low-tech carrot. Picture: Lachlan Bence

It might look low-tech but the humble carrot is helping Canadian Lead Primary pupils solve the high-tech problems of the future.

The senior class will hone their science, technology, engineering and mathematics skills, as well as their imagination, on a class project to come up with idea or invention that will brighten the future.

The Ballarat school is representing Victoria in a national STEM-X competition, run by NBN Co and Australian Business Community Network, against seven other schools nationwide.

The excited pupils had their first look at STEM-X yesterday, including time with a kit that uses connectors to allow everyday objects, even carrots, to become controllers to play music, games and more on the internet.

In May they will present their final project to a panel of tech experts during a Futurists’ Fair, streamed live via video conferencing.

“The workshop that children have done really highlights the importance of STEM and allows them to think about how STEM applies to everyday life,” said principal Darlene Cameron.

“It also develops their critical thinking and problem solving abilities … and encourages them to think a little more creatively.”

The class will use all of their STEM learning to demonstrate to judges how their innovation will have a positive impact in the future.

“We are looking forward to watching how our students’ views on STEM evolve as they think outside the box to apply these skills to their passions and future careers.”