A thousand cranes to ease cancer pain

ONE thousand painstakingly folded paper cranes – what do they represent?

For two Buninyong Primary School students they represent a simple wish – to find a cure for cancer.

Lani Wallace and Phoebe Shaw, both 12, handed over the colourful paper cranes and $1000 to the Fiona Elsey Cancer Research Institute. The pair were touched by the story of 12-year-old Japanese girl Sadako Sasaki who was diagnosed with leukaemia after being exposed to the effects of the Hiroshima bomb.

“The story goes, if you make 1000 paper cranes you get one wish – we are giving that wish to the cancer centre,” Phoebe said.

 Both girls know people whose lives have been devastated by cancer.

“It does change people’s lives,” Phoebe said.

Institute fundraising and communications manager Talitha Prendergast said the centre’s wish was clear.

“To advance our cancer research in a way that benefits everyone in our community.”

As for the paper cranes – they will be dotted around the office, reminding researchers that the community is behind them. 

A THOUSAND CRANES: Buninyong Primary School students (from left) Lani Wallace and Phoebe Shaw dig into the cranes they made. Picture: Lachlan Bence

A THOUSAND CRANES: Buninyong Primary School students (from left) Lani Wallace and Phoebe Shaw dig into the cranes they made. Picture: Lachlan Bence