Native Phascogales are defying their vulnerable status to thrive around Daylesford

NATIVE: A wildlife carer holds a young brush-tailed Phascogale, also known as a Tuan, which lives in tree hollows and forages at night on spiders, beetles and other insects.
NATIVE: A wildlife carer holds a young brush-tailed Phascogale, also known as a Tuan, which lives in tree hollows and forages at night on spiders, beetles and other insects.

Brush-tailed phascogales are thriving with five of the tiny native marsupials found during annual monitoring in Hepburn Regional Park and Wombat State Forest.

Over five days a monitoring team comprising Parks Victoria, DELWP and students studying conservation and land management at Fed Uni TAFE found three male and two female phascogales.

Phascogales are listed as vulnerable in Victoria, facing threats from cats, foxes and illegal firewood harvesting.

“Their environment is shrinking because of population growth so it’s really important we monitor them,” said FedUni TAFE education manager Jill Coote. Students have been involved in monitoring the marsupials for almost 20 years.

Numbers were down slightly from last year when numbers were elevated because of ideal conditions.