String ensemble with polish

The ACO Collective is the touring group of the Australian Chamber Orchestra. The Collective consists of some senior members of the ACO and up and coming musicians.

The concert at the Art Gallery of Ballarat last Thursday demonstrated how close the rising stars are to joining the ranks of one of the finest chamber orchestras in the world.

Directed by Malin Broman the seventeen string musicians produced ab outstanding performance of a program based largely on the bittersweet contrast of tears of joy and sorrow.

Broman took the lead role in Schubert’s Rondo for violin and strings D.438 and the viola and strings arrangement of Britten’s “Lachrymae” Op.48A. Her playing was faultless in both, with enthusiastic and precise support from the entire ensemble.

The communication between players was almost telepathic, with clarity of line and balance always secure. There were moments when the performance became quite theatrical but there was no denying the commitment of all concerned.

Ballarat was privileged to have young musicians of such fine calibre as the ACO Collective, the Australian Chamber Orchestra’s  string ensemble perform last week.

Ballarat was privileged to have young musicians of such fine calibre as the ACO Collective, the Australian Chamber Orchestra’s string ensemble perform last week.

The “Lachrymae” was preceded by arrangements of the Dowland songs which influenced Britten’s work.

Similarly, the arrangement of Schubert’s “Death and the Maiden” quartet was preceded by an arrangement of the original song.

Schubert’s D minor quartet, one of his most famous and arguably one of the most famous of all quartets  was written in 1824 when Franz Schubert realised he was dying. The orchestral effect of seventeen musicians playing one of the great quartets changed the character a little, particularly in the presto where the tarantella had more urgency and power.

The extra players added depth to the second movement drawing out the pathos of Schubert’s melody writing. The triumphant ending suggested the musicians had given everything to this marvellous music.