Trek for cancer prevention

AWARENESS: Catherine Ross wants people to know anyone, including the young and healthy, can get cancer but acting early was imperative.

AWARENESS: Catherine Ross wants people to know anyone, including the young and healthy, can get cancer but acting early was imperative.

THE call is out to get people walking in a bid to raise awareness for bowel cancer prevention.

Jodie Lee Foundation Trek is serving up a 75-kilometre challenge over two days on the picturesque Goldfields Track in early September. Participants are urged to sign up and start training now.

This time the Victorian course will start in Hepburn and trek 40km to Chewton on day one, then starting in Harcourt before moving back to Chewton (about 35km)..

Trekkers will take in a sample of the Goldfields Track, which stretches from Buninyong to Bendigo.

JLF founder and chief executive officer Nick Lee said everyone on the track plays a key role in raising awareness for the disease, in their fundraising and trek, and importantly in spreading the word that bowel cancer can be prevented.

In the Hepburn Shire, there were 30 cases of bowel cancer in adult males and 20 in adult females in the four years to 2010, according to the latest Public Health Infomation Development Unit statistics released this month.

Bowel cancer is predicted to be the leading cause of cancer death, behind lung cancer, in 2017 in the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare cancer report released in March.

More than 90 per cent of bowel cancer cases can be successfully treated if detected early.

JLF’s mission is to empower people in active steps of prevention. The foundation’s national initiatives encourage Australians to screen regularly, know their family history, act quickly on symptoms and maintain a healthy lifestyle.  

Acting quickly on symptoms is the key to catching bowel cancer early. With everything I have been through I am still maintaining a positive mindset. - Catherine Ross

Catherine Ross, from Barwon Downs near Lorne, is one of the event ambassadors. Ms Ross was diagnosed with stage three bowel cancer three years ago – she was 28 years old.

“The important take out message is that anyone can get cancer, even if you are young and otherwise healthy,” Ms Ross said.

“Acting quickly on symptoms is the key to catching bowel cancer early. With everything I have been through I am still maintaining a positive mindset.”

Details: jodileefoundation.org.au.